Marine Diesel Engines – Oil Fuel Tax Alarm May Hasten LNG Progress

By George Backwell at December 18, 2011 02:17
Filed Under: General
The international maritime sector is prime candidate to take the hit of a tax on shipping bunkers, analysts are convinced, after recent U.N. Climate Change talks in Durban agreed the design of a 'Global Climate Fund' to channel up to $100 billion a year to compensate poorer nations whilst leaving open the question of where the money would be coming from. Oxfam and green group WWF tabled a Durban motion calling for a carbon levy of  a massive $25 per tonne oil bunker tax but failed to obtain a consensus, nevertheless firing a warning shot across the industry’s bows. Latest news of advancements in the LNG fuel project for diesel engines, and a bullish forecast for future growth in LNG take-up follows below. LNG Supply Side DevelopmentsWorld-wide expansion plans for new LNG bunker station are reported by Zeus Intelligence listing in the past week supply proposals in such varied locations as on the Yangtze River; Port Fourcheon, Louisiana; Trinidad in the West Indies, and a... [More]

California Air Cleaner but Fuel Change Related Incidents on the Increase

By George Backwell at July 24, 2011 04:35
Filed Under: General
Results of an extensive atmospheric research project carried out in 2010 have now proved California’s clean-fuel regulations (applied within 24 miles of the coast since July 2009) have been effective in reducing Sulphur Dioxide air pollution from ships. In a recent press release,  Chairman of California Air Resources Board, Mary D. Nichols declared this as good news for California, and for the nation.  But there is a downside to that good news; the procedure of fuel-switching from heavy fuel (HFO) to low-sulfur distillate fuel oil (LSDFO) carries a risk of engine shutdown or malfunction, and the frequency of these incidents is on the increase.Spearheaded by scientists aboard NOAA research ship Atlantis the composition of emissions from more than 70 ships over 24 days was analysed during the ARB federal-state research project, and within that timeframe researchers also found that all ships were burning low-sulfur fuel. Assuredly, for economy, the majority had switched fu... [More]

First Hybrid Tug in Europe – Port of Rotterdam's 'RT Adriaan'

By George Backwell at June 04, 2011 22:44
Filed Under: General
Construction of the propulsion system of Europe’s first hybrid tugboat was announced at the International Tug and Salvage Conference on 17, May 2011 in Antwerp, Belgium, by Canada-based innovatory engine designers and builders Aspin, Kemp and Associates (AKA) in partnership with Dutch tug operators KOTUG International, whose Port of Rotterdam stationed tug RT Adriaan is due to be retrofitted with AKA’s proprietary ‘XeroPoint Hybrid Propulsion System’.Harbour tugs like RT Adriaan perform a wide variety of tasks across the entire power spectrum, typically including periods of 'Stand-by for pilot’s orders', short transit passages, and then bottom-line ship berthing and un-berthing operations. Opportunities for continuous engine working at or near the high power levels that give optimum diesel engine efficiency come but rarely, indeed operational analysis has shown that tugs of this type operate at low engine loads most of the time.  RT Adriaan: Photo... [More]

High Cost or High Sulfur? Dilemma Fuels Discussion

The Ship Operations Cooperative Program (SOCP) has released its recently completed study on Exhaust Gas Cleaning System (EGCS). [More]

Modernization and mission improvements will extend USS Bonhomme Richard’s service life

By Edward Lundquist at January 19, 2011 05:10
Filed Under: Navy insights
Modernization and mission improvements will extend USS Bonhomme Richard’s service life By Edward Lundquist Photos by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Joe Kane USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) is currently at NASSCO Shipyard in San Diego for  a nine-month, $101 million dry-dock planned maintenance availability period.  The repairs to the 844-foot amphibious assault ship will be completed by July 2011. The 40,358-ton Bonhomme Richard is a Wasp-class LHD, built by Northrop Grumman Ship Systems Ingalls Operations in Pascagoula, Miss., and currently assigned to the Naval Surface Force in the Pacific Fleet.  The first seven ships of this class have two boilers, two geared steam turbines, two shafts, 70,000 horsepower.  The newest member of the class, USS Makin Island (LHD 8), has two gas turbines and two shafts delivering 70,000 total shaft horsepower, as well as two 5,000 horsepower auxiliary propulsion motors.  Wasp-class LHDs can attain speeds of greate... [More]

Hydrogen Tug

By Keith Henderson at July 18, 2010 05:41
Filed Under:
At the recent International Tug & Salvage Conference in Vancouver details of a new hybrid tug was presented with the triple propulsion modes of diesel electric, battery and fuel cell claiming to give a 67 per cent emission savings over conventional diesel operation. Aim of this particular Hybrid Electric Tug design is to provide an operating mode of zero emissions for the majority of the tug's duty profile during low power operation up to 35 per cent of full power: this includes transits at a cruising speed of about nine knots. Based on a current conventional 24-m hull design developed by Capilano Maritime Design Ltd. with 55-tonne bollard pull, a more powerful 70-tonnes bollard pull version would only require minor changes to the hull and propulsion drives with an increase in battery capacity with diesel generator and fuel cell systems remaining unchanged. Four fuel cells of the PEM type are specified giving a total continuous power output of 600kWe, representing 17 per cent of power. There is a 1,000 kW-h capacity Li-Ion battery system which allows a combined power output of 1,250 kWe. A storage capacity of 1,200 kg of hydrogen provides an endurance of about 40 hours at full power, sufficient to allow refueling intervals of about once per week.
[More]

Tag cloud