Wärtsilä’s New Inline Scrubber System

By Eric Haun at March 14, 2014 11:46
Filed Under: New Technology, Scrubbers
Wärtsilä said its new inline scrubber system offers a number of “notable benefits” over conventional exhaust gas cleaning systems. Already with several ships in line for installation, the company says its new product, saves space, lowers cost and eases installation.Important for all vessels, but particularly for smaller vessels and retrofit projects, space is of chief concern when considering engine room configuration. Add after-treatment products such as scrubber systems into the mix, and space becomes an even greater priority.Sigurd Jenssen, Director, Exhaust Gas Cleaning, Wärtsilä Ship Power, said, “Space availability is a challenge that makes it difficult for many vessels to have exhaust gas cleaning systems installed.” That’s why Wärtsilä has placed a great deal of emphasis on compactness when designing its new inline scrubber system, which was engineered to conserve considerable (and precious) space. The company said thi... [More]

Marine Diesel Exhaust Gas Emissions: Bulk Carrier 2015 ECA Ready

By George Backwell at September 06, 2013 23:05
Filed Under: Marine Diesel Engines, Scrubbers
Clean Marine’s Exhaust Gas Cleaning System (EGCS, or more informally ‘scrubber system’) fitted to Torvald Klaveness’ bulk carrier MV Balder is the first, say the manufacturers, to operate this type of system inside the US Emission Control Area (ECA). The ship’s master obtained prior permission from the US Coast Guard to enter and exit the zone burning its normal Heavy Fuel Oil, with diesel engine exhaust gasses scrubbed by the EGCS, rather than burning the more expensive Low Sulphur Fuel Oil (1% Sulphur content). Bulk carrier MV Balder: Photo courtesy of Clean Marine Subsequently, officials from the U.S. Coast Guard and EPA, conducted a Port State Control examination in Baltimore and confirmed that the installed Clean Marine EGCS was operating satisfactorily and in full compliance with MARPOL Annex VI as an alternative to burning low sulphur fuel oil as set out in the vessel’s  International Air Pollution Prevention Certificate.  MV Balder ... [More]

New Bunker Fuel-blending S3 Device: A Scrubber Alternative For Some Trades

By George Backwell at August 17, 2013 00:49
Filed Under: Fuels & Lubes, Marine Diesel Engines, New Technology
The S3 switch (a marketing acronym for ‘Smart Sulphur Switch) is a prototype developed by Denmark’s Insatech in cooperation with O.W. Bunkers, to blend and adjust two fuels (HFO and MDO) to a desired sulphur content enabling monitoring and control of marine diesel engine exhaust gas emissions without fitting expensive scrubber units.  The S3 is presently on trial aboard ships belonging to some of this major bunker supplier’s customers in Northern European waters, and commercial production is planned for later this year. S3 Fuel Switch Skid: Image credit Insatech Fuel Switching and BlendingOn most modern ships two service tanks are provided: one service tank contains the higher sulphur fuel oil and the other may contain low sulphur fuel to ensure MARPOL Annex VI emission regulations are met. This arrangement will involve a fuel changeover at some point during the ship’s engine operation, normally achieved by means of a three-way valve, and it is at this poin... [More]

Ships Green Lean & Mean by 2020 Says New Analysis

By George Backwell at November 24, 2012 04:10
Filed Under: General, Research & Development
The world fleet will be greener, leaner and meaner in the next eight years according to DNV’s Research and Innovation Unit in their just published ‘Technology Outlook 2020’ as they follow the example of the poet Tennyson – “For I dipt into the future, far as human eye could see, saw the vision of the world, and all the wonder that would be.”  So too, the DNV team made many correct predictions in its last 2008 ‘Outlook’ (although they admit surprise that the wind energy sector developed so rapidly) which gives added weight to their latest analysis. Photo credit:stock.xchange (Goodmorph) Key prognostications with a bearing on developments in marine power and propulsion technology, follow. Upcoming Energy Efficient Design Index (EEDI)The EEDI (Energy Efficient Design Index) regulation requires new-buildings in 2025 to be 30% more energy efficient than today’s average ship which will drive implementation of energy efficiency mea... [More]

Refineries May Foil IMO Aims to Cut SOx Emissions in Exhaust Gas

By George Backwell at January 31, 2011 00:31
Filed Under: General
'Refiners threaten anti-pollution efforts in shipping', blared the caption of a Reuters article by correspondents Kan and Fabi on 17, January 2011, then coincidentally, came news a couple of days later that Wärtsilä was to retrofit the Containerships Vll, 13,995 dwt,  (owned by Helsinki based Containerships Ltd. OY) with their diesel engine exhaust-gas scrubber. Wärtsilä's first ever installation of a commercial marine scrubber (to serve their W7L64 main diesel engine) is intended to enable the ship to meet impending targets for reduced exhaust gas emissions of SOx in Emission Control Areas's while continuing to burn diesel fuel with sulfur content above the set limits. Containerships Vll: Photo Credit, Jens Boldt Bunkers With Minimal Sulfur to Become Scarce? Experts in the field pronounce that SOx emissions in diesel engine exhaust gas‚ which mostly comprise sulphur dioxide with a small amount of sulphur trioxide‚ are a function of the amount ... [More]

Exhaust Gas Scrubbers

By Keith Henderson at August 16, 2010 08:29
Filed Under:

The expansion of Emission Control Areas (ECA) in North American and European waters leaves ship owners using HFO with little choice other than to use a more expensive low sulfur HFO, change to MDO completely or use a dual fuel arrangement. The latter not only necessitates installing additional tanks and fuel handling equipment but also requires careful change over procedures to be followed every single time to avoid potential engine problems that can be very severe. An area that a few operators are pioneering is the use of exhaust seawater scrubbers. Hamworthy Krystallon produce a Seawater Scrubber that is designed to operate on a 3.5 per cent S HFO 380 fuel while complying with the EU in-port and MARPOL Annex VI requirement of a 0.1 per cent sulfur fuel. Hamworthy Krystallon early orders from Italian owner have been followed this month by an order to equip four 45,000 dwt ro-ro new builds at Daewoo. Sembawang Shipyard (SSPL), Singapore are interested in a potential retrofit project for seawater scrubbers. Switching to low sulfur fuels will create supply problems according to he International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association


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