What fuel will ocean-going ships be burning 16 years down the road?

By George Backwell at March 14, 2014 22:23
Filed Under: Fuels & Lubes
Heavy fuel oil will remain the main fuel for deep sea shipping in year 2030 indicates new research from Lloyd’s Register and University College London’s Energy Institute. In a complex study involving many inter-related factors,  ‘Global Marine Fuel Trends 2030’ (GMFT 2030) limits itself to the container ship, bulk carrier/general cargo and tanker (crude & chemical/products) sectors which represent about 70% of the shipping industry’s fuel demand. VLCC: File photo Marine fuels considered: Ranged from liquid fuels used today (HFO, MDO/MGO) to their bio-alternatives (bio-diesel, straight vegetable oil) and from LNG and biogas to methanol and hydrogen (derived both from methane or wood biomass) were included in the study.Engine technologiesIncluded were 2 or 4-stroke diesels, diesel-electric, gas engines and fuel cell technology. Since the uptake of certain fuels is influenced by them, a wide range of energy efficiency technologies and abatement solu... [More]

Marine Diesel Exhaust Gas Emissions: Bulk Carrier 2015 ECA Ready

By George Backwell at September 06, 2013 23:05
Filed Under: Marine Diesel Engines, Scrubbers
Clean Marine’s Exhaust Gas Cleaning System (EGCS, or more informally ‘scrubber system’) fitted to Torvald Klaveness’ bulk carrier MV Balder is the first, say the manufacturers, to operate this type of system inside the US Emission Control Area (ECA). The ship’s master obtained prior permission from the US Coast Guard to enter and exit the zone burning its normal Heavy Fuel Oil, with diesel engine exhaust gasses scrubbed by the EGCS, rather than burning the more expensive Low Sulphur Fuel Oil (1% Sulphur content). Bulk carrier MV Balder: Photo courtesy of Clean Marine Subsequently, officials from the U.S. Coast Guard and EPA, conducted a Port State Control examination in Baltimore and confirmed that the installed Clean Marine EGCS was operating satisfactorily and in full compliance with MARPOL Annex VI as an alternative to burning low sulphur fuel oil as set out in the vessel’s  International Air Pollution Prevention Certificate.  MV Balder ... [More]

Bulk Carrier VLOC 'Vale Beijing' – Dry-dock Next Destination

By George Backwell at January 01, 2012 04:07
Filed Under: Company News, General
Good news and bad for Vale as the Old Year gave way to the New. First the good news: after a six month delay since these columns told of the maiden voyage of VLOC Vale Brasil at long last a Valemax VLOC (Berge Everest) gained China entry to discharge iron ore from the Vale conglomerate’s Brazil minefields. The bad news, also coming before Christmas, concerned another of their juggernauts, Vale Beijing. VLOC Vale Beijing Loading Iron Ore: Photo courtesy of STX A few days ago VLOC Vale Beijing was towed off the berth to avoid risk of foundering alongside the Vale iron ore loading terminal at Ponta Madeira, having earlier reported ingress of water to a partly loaded cargo hold. According to Lloyd’s List  a full hull scan by robot device confirmed cracks to the hull with the ship’s three ballast pumps working around the clock to contain the flow. What is the extent of the damage to Vale Beijing? Vale Beijing Structural Damage In a few words, the hull plating wa... [More]

Green by Design 'Emerald' – Bestway, Shanghai & LR Complete Project

By George Backwell at February 13, 2011 22:09
Filed Under: General, General, Research & Development, Research & Development
'Emerald', a Midsize concept bulk carrier of 35,000 dwt, designed jointly by Bestway Marine Engineering Design of Shanghai and classification society Lloyds Register, bettered by 18% existing performance of standard bulk carriers as measured by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) 'Energy Efficient Design Index' (EEDI) according to the project leaders' announcement on 1, February 2011.It may be helpful to explain briefly 'EEDI', since it provided base measure for the  'Emerald' design team's work, and an associated new regulatory development also seems worth mentioning here.Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI)EEDI relates to efforts by IMO to limit global warming through pollution of the environment by marine engines, allowing a specific figure for an individual ship design to be calculated by means of a fairly complex formula. It is expressed in grams of CO2 per ship's capacity-mile, and a smaller EEDI value indicates a more energy-efficient ship design. The far more co... [More]

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