Balance of Power Favours New Hi-tech North Sea Fishing Trawler

By George Backwell at December 06, 2013 22:37
Filed Under: Marine Diesel Engines
A 600 kW/cyl MAN 6L32/44CR main engine is to be installed in a new North Sea fishing purse-seiner/trawler, the first ever common rail engine to be installed in a vessel of this type in the Norwegian commercial fishing sector, according to engine builders MAN Diesel and Turbo. Graphic rendering of the Kvannøy (courtesy Hansen Dahl) A widely-used engine in merchant ships, the 32/44CR marine diesel engine was the manufacturer’s first all-electronic four-stroke engine, launched in 2006 to supplement the popular 32/40 series with a CR fuel- injected derivative.  The six-cylinder version 32/44 engine (32 cm bore/44 cm stroke) is rated at 3,600 kW and uses the latest MAN Diesel & Turbo common rail technology to enable the flexible setting of injection timing, duration and pressure for each cylinder. Thus fuel consumption and emissions may be optimised at any point on the operating profile.
Norwegian shipping company, Nyholmen AS has chosen a system for their new 77.25-m ... [More]

'Vale Brasil' Juggernaut Iron-ore Ship En-route to China Powered by Wärtsilä

By George Backwell at May 28, 2011 21:37
Filed Under:
Vale Brasil, the world’s largest ore-carrier, this week en route from the NE coast of Brazil on her maiden voyage to Darien, China, is loaded with 391,000 tons of iron-ore. A juggernaut seen by market analyst Erik Nikolai Stavseth, of Arctic Securities ASA in Oslo, as one of a breed of ‘sea monsters’ (more of the same are on order by Brazilian mining conglomerate Vale) that will change the way iron-ore flows to satisfy China’s enormous appetite for the commodity. Why build such gigantic iron-ore carriers, bearing in mind the design challenges? Simply in order to make Brazilian iron-ore competitive in price with the Australian delivery to the Chinese market, despite the commodity having to travel almost double the ocean distance; Vale Brasil offers lower freight costs gained through economy of scale.The good news is that this ship will be flexing green power muscles with a carbon footprint of 34% less per tonne of cargo carried than traditional Capesize vessels &... [More]

Tag cloud