Shipping company Hapag-Lloyd connects first ship to shore power

By Peter Pospiech at December 03, 2012 10:50
Filed Under: Company News, drive systems, Ports

With the arrival of the “Dallas Express” at the Port of Oakland in California, at the beginning of December 2012, Hapag-Lloyd has for the first time connected one of its ships to shore-based power. Shore Power (also known as “cold-ironing”) is a ship-to-shore connection that provides electrical power to the ship. By using this connection the auxiliary engines normally used to provide power on board can be switched off, reducing diesel and other air pollutant emissions from ships while they are at berth. Other ports around the world are also working on shore-based power systems. The Port of Oakland recently completed installation of the 6,600 volt shore-based power supply after an initial test with Hapag-Lloyd last August. The “Dallas Express” is the first ship to use it now.

Dallas Express at the Port of Oakland

In California shore-based power will be mandatory for a certain percentage of ship calls by any particular shipping line with the beginning of 2014. Hapag-Lloyd is already preparing a total of 15 vessels for the High Voltage Shore Connection (HVSC) of which the “Dallas Express” was the project ship. A 40-foot container is located at the stern of the 4,860-TEU vessel. This contains electrical components and an extendable cable drum for the actual connection to the shore-based source. The drum automatically balances out tidal lift during lay time.

A 40-foot container is located at the stern of the Dallas Express

The special container has been jointly developed by Hapag-Lloyd and the Hamburg based company SAM Electronics. The modular shore connection system of SAM Electronics, SAMCon, is designed for installations on large and small container vessels with 450V/ 6.6. kV/11 kV. The development is in response to the huge exhaust gas emission from ships berthing at ports. It is in accordance with the requirements for environmental friendly power supplies within ports, mitigating air pollution and keeping civil health. The design can be used for the entire Hapag-Lloyd-Fleet, independent of shipboard voltage and the required power of a ship. In the event of a ship changing trade route, or maintenance of the container, the container can be swapped.

The special container has been jointly developed by Hapag-Lloyd and the Hamburg based company SAM Electronics.

As part of the Pacific Atlantic Express Service (PAX) the „Dallas Express“ connects 19 ports in North Europe (Hamburg, Rotterdam, Antwerp and Thamesport), North America and Asia.

 

Pictures: courtesy of Hapag-Lloyd and SAM Electronics

 

Comments (2) -

LOOKS LIKE A GREAT IDEA.  THE TITLE SEEMED A BIT CONFUSING, AS I THOUGHT THAT A NEW CONCEPT OF POWER BARGE HAS COME ABOUT WHERE A FLOATER PROVIDES POWER TO SHORE CONSUMERS.

FOR COMMERCIAL VESSELS THIS (SHORE SUPPLY POWER) MAYBE RELATIVELY NEW. I UNDERSTAND IT IS STANDARD DESIGN ON MOST NAVAL VESSELS, POSSIBLY LOWER RATINGS.

IN ANY EVENT A POSITIVE DEVELOPMENT AND HOPEFULLY WILL CATCH ON INTERNATIONALLY AND NEW BUILDS WILL INCORPORATE THE FACILITY  WITH SOME STANDARDIZATION NORMS BROUGHT IN.

PM MENON |     12/5/2012 9:37:26 PM #

Dear Menon
The system has alrteady been starndardized for ships by ISO,IEC & IEEE (under joint PT IEC 60092-510)  and most of the classification societies already have respective notation HVSC, However Llyod Register notation is called OPS which is basically the same.

You may fetch the information through google by key words HVSC, and hope that you will find all needful information concerned, should you still require any further information, please revert with your email ID so I can send you respective infmroation as needed.

Thanks and best of luck.

regards

Manzoor shaikh

Manzoor Shaikh |     12/12/2012 11:52:04 PM #

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