Reducing Air Drag

By Keith Henderson at August 22, 2010 09:58
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Since 2008, there is a UK based shipping environmental charity called Greenwave that strives to develop policies that not only encourage but reward ship owners for the early adoption of technologies designed to reduce emissions. Their emphasis is on new technical solutions rather than improving existing best practices such as hull and propulsion machinery maintenance, weather routing etc.One of two wind related projects is Turbo-foil, which seeks to reduce the aerodynamic drag of ships. While much attention is devoted to hydrodynamic design, the aerodynamic design, streamlining of ships hasn't changed much over the years with the exception of warships, cruise ships and mega yachts. Tests carried out in the wind tunnel at the University of Auckland has identified where the turbulence is greatest, and where fairing should be mounted to reduce drag. According to Greenwave, practical tests demonstrate that Turbo-foil can reduce above deck drag by at least 20 per cent equivalent to an annual saving of 50 tons of fuel and 150 tons of CO2 production.
Since 2008, there is a UK based shipping environmental charity called Greenwave that strives to develop policies that not only encourage but reward ship owners for the early adoption of technologies designed to reduce emissions. Greenwave’s emphasis is on new technical solutions rather than improving existing best practices such as hull and propulsion machinery maintenance, weather routing etc.

Their objective approach is to use sound engineering principles to research and develop products that work as opposed to pure theoretical research. In the selection of projects it must have a retro fit capability, be sustainable yet recyclable at life end, require no additional crew and last but not least, show a positive return on investment withing three years!

One of two wind related projects currently under investigation, appear to be offering these beneficial results. Turbo-foil, as it is called, seeks to reduce the aerodynamic drag of ships. If you look at automobiles from the 1930's compared to today’s vehicles the difference is obvious and the drag greatly reduced.

Looking to ships, while much attention is devoted to hydrodynamic design, the aerodynamic design, streamlining hasn't changed much over the years with the exception of warships, cruise ships and. Tests carried out in the wind tunnel at the University of Auckland, New Zealand modeling a ship’s superstructure has identified where the turbulence is greatest and tests which kind of fairings and where they should be mounted to be most beneficial in reducing drag.
After special fairings were manufactured the ship’s own engineers where able to mount them within two days providing an immediate benefit.

According to Greenwave, practical tests demonstrate that Turbo-foil can reduce above deck drag by at least 20 per cent equivalent to an annual saving of 50 tons of fuel and 150 tons of CO2 production. For maximum benefit the Turbo Foil aerodynamic drag kit is most appropriate for vessels regularly sailing routes with the wind on the bow.


   
 
 
 
 
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