Royal Caribbean Stewardship

By Keith Henderson at August 26, 2010 17:46
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The recently issued annual “Stewardship Report” from Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd includes some detail of its efforts and successes in implementing efficiencies across its fleet of 38 cruise ships. Fuel consumption for 2009 is reduced by 3.7 per cent. The reduction is not absolute but expressed as a ratio to the number of available passenger cruise days (APCD). The saving is partly due to the addition to the fleet of two new ships. These efficiency successes follow a number of years of measuring, testing and deploying a variety of systems including improved hydrodynamics, propeller, propulsion and hull designs. Examples of savings are widespread. Three ships have thin film solar panels on their top decks which provides electricity, on other ships incandescent bulbs are being phased out in favor of LEDs. Many of the ships have the ability to use cold sea water cooling when cruising in the Arctic or Baltic to reduce production of chilled water. Royal Caribbean’s goal for 2010 is to further increase its efficiencies.
The recently issued annual “Stewardship Report” from Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd includes some detail of its efforts and successes in implementing efficiencies across its fleet of 38 cruise ships. Already achieving an average fuel consumption reduction of 4 per cent in 2008, consumption for 2009 is reduced by a further 3.7 per cent. Not only is this a major cost saving but a proportional reduction of harmful emissions. The reduction is not absolute but expressed as a ratio to the number of available passenger cruise days (APCD).

The saving is partly due to the addition to the fleet of two new ships Celebrity Equinox and Oasis of the Seas. These successes follow a number of years of measuring, testing and deploying a variety of systems including improved hydrodynamics, propeller, propulsion and hull designs. A breakdown of how the consumed fuel was used gives 60 per cent for propulsion including maneuvering, 16 per cent for what is commonly called hotel operations, 11 per cent for heating, ventilation and air conditioning and 13 per cent for engine room and auxiliary equipment.

Examples of savings are widespread. Three ships have thin film solar panels on their top decks which provides electricity to power 7,000 LED lights on two ships and fixed lighting on the Royal Promenade on Oasis of the Seas. On other ships incandescent bulbs are being phased out in favor of LEDs not only to reduce electrical consumption sometimes by as much as 80 per cent - there is a noticeable benefit in the approximate 50 per cent reduction in heat generation with a commensurate lowering of the air conditioning requirement: the LEDs also last much longer and can be recycled.

Many of the ships have the ability to use cold sea water cooling when cruising in the Arctic or Baltic to reduce production of chilled water rendering a saving of between four and five tonnes of fuel daily per ship. Other efficiencies include solar window films to keep the ships cooler, which reduces fuel consumption and associated emissions.

Careful monitoring and adjusting the ship's speed and heading, using inputs of time, wind and current vectors, temperature, and overall sea conditions allows tangible fuel saving to be made. Keeping the ship properly trimmed also saves energy, a system with sensors shows if the ship is listing or out of fore and aft trim and assists in its optimization based on current sea conditions, thereby improving fuel efficiency.

Royal Caribbean’s goal for 2010 is to further increase its efficiencies and save an additional 2.5 percent per APCD and on the subject of greenhouse gase (GHG) in the longer term, it aims to reduce its overall emissions by one third per APCD by 2015, compared to 2008 levels.
 
 
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