Super-Clean Diesel Fuel on test on “Smit Elbe” Harbour Tug

By Peter Pospiech at January 09, 2014 04:00
Filed Under: Company News, drive systems, Fuels & Lubes, LNG fuel
SMIT, a member of Royal Boskalis Westminster N.V., says that their harbor tug “Smit Elbe”, which works in the Port of Rotterdam, has become the first tugboat in the Netherlands which runs with GTL (Gas-to-Liquid). GTL fuel is a synthetic fuel, produced from natural gas by chemical transformation. GTL fuel is clean: it is non-toxic, biodegradable, and does not contain nitrogen or sulfur. GTL Diesel is pollution free with no sulfur, aromatics, or toxic ingredients -- so pure that one can even drink it; simply hydrogen and carbon. Blending just 20 percent GTL diesel with conventional diesel results in a fuel that exceeds nearly all international environmental standards for 2015. SMIT ELBE runs on GTL The tug will run on GTL for about six months to determine whether the fuel is able to effect a remarkable reduction in emissions without the engines being adapted. The drive line of the tug consist of two fixed pitch ASD propellers driven by two Caterpillar 3516B TA HD/C engines,... [More]

A Real Innovation in Cruise Ferries

Again: Norwegian shipping companies taking the lead in propulsion innovationMS Stavangerfjord is worldwide the first large cruise ferry powered exclusively by natural gas (using "single fuelled gas engines"). For this reason, this ship is the most environmentally friendly in their class with significant environmental benefits compared to ships powered by traditional heavy fuel oil. Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) are reduced by 92 percent. Emissions of sulfur are eliminated completely, while particulate emissions are reduced by 98 percent. Last but not least, the technology the shipping company Fjord Line uses reduces emissions of greenhouse gases (CO2) by 23 percent. Stavangerfjord has been set in service in mid of July 2013 and runs, as expected, fully satisfactory for its owner.The used “green motor technology from Rolls Royce” is well-proven on a number of ferries and ships used in the offshore industry. In addition to reducing emissions to a minimum, the ships will ... [More]

Natural Gas on the rise for Japan’s Workboats

NYK to Build Japan's First Natural Gas-Fueled TugNYK will build a tugboat featuring a dual fuel engine that can be powered by either Natural Gas, which will be stored as LNG, or heavy fuel oil. Other than LNG carriers, this tugboat will be the first building in Japan of a Natural Gas-fueled vessel. NYK has enhanced its initiatives to mitigate environmental loads through the practical realization of environment-responsive technologies such as solar-powered systems and air-lubrication systems. In 2011, NYK established a team in the company’s Fuel Group to research next-generation fuel alternatives to heavy oil, and looked into building a Natural Gas-fueled vessel with the cooperation of Nippon Kaiji Kyokai and others, based on the results of a survey conducted by the Japan Railway Construction, Transport and Technology Agency. Natural Gas received attention as a possible alternative to heavy oil because NG does not emit any SOX and produces far less CO2 and NOX compared to heavy ... [More]

Fiercer environmental legislations as of 2015 depress shipping

By Peter Pospiech at December 10, 2013 04:00
Filed Under: Fuels & Lubes, General, New Technology, Scrubbers
Trade fears cost increase – Shipping owner under considerable pressure Shipping traffic on North- and Baltic Sea becomes notable more environmentally friendly as of 2015 – and could just generate significant cost increases also in other segments.The allowed amount of ships sulfur emission drops to a maximum of one tenth of the previous amount. In addition also less nitrogen oxides and particulate matters are allowed. This is of the benefit to the environment, because the maritime traffic is a huge burden for the sensitive marine ecosystem and the air quality along the coast line. But due to the more stringent regulations a series of negative consequences will follow in other areas.About 4.000 vessels are in regular service on the North- and Baltic Sea (SECA areas). Shipping owners have the possibility to fulfil these regulations by using expensive sulfur free fuels or they install afterwards scrubber systems in their ships. Container vessels with black trail of smoke - exp... [More]

LNG to be available in Hamburg and Bremerhaven by 2015

By Peter Pospiech at November 27, 2013 05:32
Filed Under: Company News, Fuels & Lubes, LNG fuel, Ports
Bomin Linde LNG starts the implementation process for both terminals The plans for building and operating the two terminals in Hamburg and Bremerhaven, the future hubs of the German coastal LNG supply, have come to maturity. Currently, Bomin Linde LNG is finalising preparations to enable manufacturing of the key parts and prompt construction of the LNG facilities. The terminals will be installed on a modular basis and will have sufficient flexibility to quickly meet a rise in demand. Starting from the strategic hubs Hamburg and Bremerhaven, neighbouring ports such as Kiel, Lübeck, Rostock or Wilhelmshaven can be reliably supplied with LNG. "We are fully on track with the projects and will be able to provide ships in all German ports along the North and Baltic Sea with LNG as a clean fuel," said Bomin Linde LNG Managing Director Ruben Benders. "This is an important step to establishing LNG as a marine fuel," added Mahinde Abeynaike, also Managing Director of Bomin Linde LNG. "The s... [More]

Cruise Shipping Companies like to bunker in Hamburg

By Peter Pospiech at November 21, 2013 05:39
Filed Under: Fuels & Lubes, General, Ports
Exactness and reliability at maritime services are important One factor of the great success of port of Hamburg as a cruise shipping venue is the extremely reliable working port service segment. In the cruise industry it is very much essential that the ships are precisely on time. This is particularly important for the short trips. The universal port of Hamburg has gained its very good image in the time-sensitive container shipping segment and has now transferred it also into the very ambitious cruise vessels. “It must be a precision landing”, says Stefan Frommann, member of the board of the Friedrich G. Frommann GmbH. The worldwide active company belongs to a small circle of companies who are selling and supplying fuels and lube oils in Hamburg. The company uses, among others, four bunker boats. The latest and newest, “Seeve” and “Dresden II” supplied recently fuel and oils to the “Queen Mary 2”. The huge cruise liner moored in Hamburg i... [More]

LNG Global Bunkering Safety Standards RP Tabled by DNV GL

By George Backwell at October 19, 2013 00:26
Filed Under: Fuels & Lubes, LNG fuel
Classification Society DNV GL has published the draft of a Recommended Practice (RP) for maritime LNG bunkering which after a six-week consultation period will be published as a practical guide to help authorities, LNG bunker suppliers and ship operators undertake LNG bunkering safely and efficiently. This article overviews their initiative. LNG bunkering: Rendering courtesy of DNV GL Currently, 83 LNG-fuelled ships are in operation or on order worldwide, ranging from passenger ferries, Coast Guard ships and cargo vessels to tankers and platform supply vessels. Estimates put the global LNG-fuelled fleet at 3,200 by the year 2025. With the EU poised to invest in helping equip 139 seaports and inland ports with LNG bunker stations by 2025, the time seemed  ripe to DNV GL for it to set out RP’s for the design and operation of LNG bunkering on a global  scale. But roughly, what dangers are inherent in LNG bunkering?LNG release by accidentAt atmospheric pressure, LNG will bo... [More]

Rolls-Royce powers world's first tug driven by natural gas engines

By Peter Pospiech at October 15, 2013 03:31
Filed Under: Company News, drive systems, Fuels & Lubes, LNG fuel, Shipyards, Workboats
Rolls-Royce has congratulated Sanmar Shipyard for the completion of the world's first gas powered tug, in a ceremony in Istanbul, Turkey, this weekend. Sanmar has completed the first of two tugs for Norwegian customer Buksér og Berging, which each feature two Rolls-Royce Bergen C26:33L6PG engines fueled purely by natural gas (stored as LNG), with a combined output of 3,410kW (1,705 kW each) at 1,000 rev/min.The lean-burn engines operates on the Otto cycle with mixture compression and an external ignition source.A rich gas/air mix in a precombustion chamber is ignited and forms a strong ignition source for the very lean mixture in the cylinder for knock-free combustion. The engines are direct coupled to Rolls-Royce azimuthing Z-drives mounted aft in ASD configuration with controllable pitch propellers. Also, the new hull and propulsion system will achieve up to 20% higher thrust efficiency compared to standard designs. The LNG system is designed by AGA Cryo and comprises an ... [More]

Fleet in service – exploit its potential, control costs: Area of adverse weather increases fuel costs

By Peter Pospiech at October 03, 2013 04:13
Filed Under: drive systems, Fuels & Lubes, General
Fuel consumption and time are an important factor when planning ship routes. But more and more also actual weather conditions are considered. Wind and waves have a significant impact on operating costs of fleets in service. Unfavourable conditions cause higher fuel consumption, delays and often also damages on ships or cargo. Even if the vessels captain cannot change the weather he has avoidance strategies on hand to bypass the area of adverse weather or can adapt the vessels speed to reach the expected danger area before or after the bad weather phase.  Storm and high waves increases time and fuel costs - but they can be purposefully bypassed The magic word is “Weather Routing”. Intelligent weather-routing can remarkably reduce these additional costs with less expense. Modern weather-routing software uses weather-, waves- and disturbances information as well as vessel hydrodynamic details for ships specific routing recommendations at minimal drive power and optimized... [More]

Fleet in service – exploit its potential, control costs: Fuel Saving with Trim Optimization

By Peter Pospiech at September 30, 2013 06:30
Filed Under: Company News, drive systems, Fuels & Lubes, General
The maritime-shipping industry has also been forced to contend with the key issues of energy efficiency and sustainability. Optimizing the trim of a ship is a good way to achieve lasting reductions in fuel consumption. In fact, trim optimization has been an object of investigation since the 1990s. Back then, forward-thinking German shipowners were using models in towing tests designed to determine the trim that produced the lowest resistance as a ship moved through water. These tests showed that in many cases a slightly lower forward draft yielded the ideal trim. Based on these findings, INTERSCHALT added a ballast optimization tool to its MACS3 loading computer system. However, over the next 15 years interest in this special module declined because the costs for conducting the associated towing tests proved to be too high. Significant fuel saving by trim optimization "Determining the optimum trim is one thing; being able to practically apply these findings in actual ship operation is... [More]

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