The Propulsion System of the Future

By Eric Haun at July 12, 2016 11:16
Filed Under: General, New Technology, Propulsion systems, Research & Development
What will the marine propulsion system of the future look like? An interview with Dr. Andreas Lingens, Executive Vice President Development at MTU. [More]

Australia Prepares for LNG Fueled Vessels

By Eric Haun at May 25, 2016 09:31
Filed Under: Fuels & Lubes, General, LNG fuel
Australia is well positioned to employ vessels fueled by LNG, experts say [More]

Lower Fuel Consumption for Slow Steaming

By Eric Haun at May 30, 2014 12:50
Filed Under: General, Marine Diesel Engines, New Technology
New marine diesel engine from MHI-MME offers lower fuel consumption during slow steaming [More]

World’s largest Bilobe-Liquid Gas Storage Tanks

Sinopacific builds cargo tanks for 9.686 cubic meter with BV-ClassThe future of the Natural Gas Shipping keeps a majority of the shipping industry busy. Again and again new equipment and machinery is developed. Such as in China. At present there arise the largest Bilobe-Liquid Gas Storage tanks.They are nearing completion at China’s Sinopacific yard and will be installed in a series of four 27,500 cu m semi-refrigerated LNG/Ethylene carriers building for Denmark’s Shipping Company Evergas. Each of the IMO Type C Bilobe tanks has a capacity of 9,686 cu m. Two of the tanks in each vessel will be supplemented by a third conical Type C cargo tank and a smaller LNG fuel tank on the deck of the vessels. International classification society Bureau Veritas is classing the world’s largest Bilobe-Gas Tanks. Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE ... [More]

Older Ship Engines Concern MOU Inspectors, But Who’s to Blame?

By George Backwell at February 21, 2014 23:51
Filed Under: General, Marine Diesel Engines
More than half of all ship detentions involved ships of 20 years or more in age according to preliminary results from the recent Concentrated Inspection Campaign (CIC) on Propulsion and Auxiliary Machinery in the Paris MoU region. Problem areas included the propulsion of the main engine, cleanliness of the engine room and emergency source of power/emergency generator. There is a saying that research confirms what you already knew, and the essential inspection finding that things are more often not as they ought to be in an older engine room than in a more modern one is no exception to that rule. Why that should be so is not pointed up in the CIC preliminary report, so we’ll circle around that question here.Cleanliness is next to …There’s no excuse for badly maintained and dirty machinery in dirty engine room compartments –  no matter what the age of the ship – but far more time and effort is needed to keep them up to the mark. Sleeves have to be kept... [More]

No positive shifts on bunker claims

By Peter Pospiech at February 13, 2014 04:00
Filed Under: Fuels & Lubes, General
Damages’ risks due to unsatisfactory fuel quality expanding in leaps and bounds Jens Maul Jorgensen, Director for fuel and risk management at the Lübeck shipping company Oldendorff Carriers, warned on an event of the insurance company Skuld in Hamburg. Recent statistics of the from Oldendorff engaged test laboratory showed that the amount of negative checked fuel probes, on a worldwide basis, has been drastically increased during the last year from 21 to 23%.The situation “frightens me” warned Jorgensen, who is also President of the International Bunker Industry Association (IBIA). He expects that the bunker quality of the available bunker in the ports is going to be worse during the next years. Many factors are responsible for this. Of the one part more and more amounts of heavy fuel must be mixed respectively diluted to reduce the sulfur content which will be restricted during the next years, because of the upcoming international standards. Hereby increases the... [More]

Ghost ships on the Oceans – Who says it doesn’t work? Part 2

New functions for the autonomous ship The KISS principle will also be applied to the ship itself and it is also important to look at how existing vessels can be modified to support unmanned operation. At the hardware level, technical modifications will be necessary, for example to the fuel-processing system, while an electric-powered water-jet for back-up propulsion and steering may have to be retrofitted.New sensors to replace the look-out are also an important part of the unmanned ship. A combination of high resolution radar, low-Iight and infrared cameras form the 'advanced sensor system'. Most of the technology involved is already available and its adoption would be more a question of cost than of general availability. The sensor-system will be integrated with more conventional equipment such as the AIS system and ARPA radar. Computer-based data fusion, using Information from the various sensors, will further increase the capability of the sensor system. All these systems are alre... [More]

Ghost ships on the Ocean - Who says it doesn’t work?

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Shipping companies will choose marine gas oil

By Peter Pospiech at January 23, 2014 04:00
Filed Under: Fuels & Lubes, General, LNG fuel, Scrubbers
A recent North European conducted survey of some of the biggest shipping companies in Europe shows that they  will choose the low-sulfur marine gas oil when the new emission regulations comes into force next year.Some of Europe's large shipping owners without doubts will choose to use the more expensive, low-sulfur marine gas oil once the environmental regulations aimed at reducing the sulfur content in ship fuel comes into effect on January 1st 2015 in the European SECA zone. The alternatives to switching to marine gas oil with a lower sulfur content include continuing to use the traditional high sulfur fuel and cleaning it with scrubber (exhaust cleaning system), or switching to natural gas (LNG). While a big number of shipping companies have announced intentions of switching to natural gas on the long term (there is no doubt: it will come), the survey shows that a majority of the carriers choose marine gas oil as the immediate solution, although it costs much more than fuel wit... [More]

A closer look inside the new Alfa Laval Test & Training Centre

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