Fleet in service – exploit its potential, control costs: Lesser Power for Big Engines

By Peter Pospiech at October 17, 2013 10:28
Filed Under: Company News, drive systems, General, Marine Diesel Engines
De-rating of prime mover reduces fuel consumption In today’s environment of slow steaming, a permanent engine reduction can increase remarkably the economy of existing vessels and reduce the fuel consumption under these new engine load conditions. Main engines are normally designed for a specific high speed. However, for Slow-Steaming another Power-Speed-Course is decisive. A throttling of the engines reduces the engine specific maximal continuous power (MCR) and with this, the designed maximal speed of the vessel permanently. This leads to a higher economy with lower specific fuel consumption (sfoc). MV Cap San Nicolas (9.600 TEU) in service since May 2013 Measures for throttling include the modification of the injectors, plates between crosshead and piston rod as well as a new set-up of the turbo charger. This means, that always the engines technical data have to be changed. In addition also cylinders can be cut-off - this has to be done in connection with a new torsional vibr... [More]

Fleet in service – exploit its potential, control costs: Bunker saving with fast vessels

By Peter Pospiech at October 10, 2013 04:05
Filed Under: Company News, drive systems, General, New Technology, Propulsion systems
Propulsion improvement adaptations achieve fuel consumption decrease, depending on ships type, of up to six percent. To reduce fuel consumption on vessels, different propulsion improvement adaptions can be done – according to type of vessels and operating range. While pre-swirl-equipments increase the propeller force, boost nozzles the drive efficiency by an effective propeller force. Post-swirl-equipments are leading partly the torsional energy back into forward speed. Because of these pre-swirl-equipments or nozzles fuel consumption can be reduced by up to 5% and by propeller fins and rudder bowls of up to 2%. The following adaptations can be used: pre-swirl-stator, post-swirl-fins, nozzles, propeller fins, German Leitrad and Costa-Bowl. Which adaptation leads to an efficiency increase depends on the operating profile of the vessel. To evaluate the potential as well as the interaction with the ship’s hull and also other components, an analysis by the help of computational... [More]

European Inland Waterway Shipping in search of the ultimate propulsion

By Peter Pospiech at October 08, 2013 05:36
Filed Under: drive systems, General, Marine Electronics, Propulsion systems
MV GOBLIN navigates variable Willy Vranken, owner of Scheepvaartbedrijf VrankenBV based in Maasbracht, Netherlands, has put a lot of thoughts into a propulsion system for his new inland waterway ship, which ensures the maximum benefit for him. At Boost-Shipyard, Trier / Germany, the hull was built: “I want to have a ship which is of high quality. The imported hulls do not fulfill my requirements”. The complete interior has been done by Dutch company Koedood Dieselservice. The bulker, named GOBLIN, features 135 m in length, 11.45 m in width and a max draft of 3.79 m. With this the ship can load 4.400 to. Bulker GOBLIN ready for unloading 4.000 to corn at Cargill-Krefeld The hybrid propulsion Willy Vranken has decided to go for a two propeller ship. “With this, I have the possibility to navigate also in low water periods, because both the propellers have a smaller diameter”. The drive line consist, for each shaft, of a 12 cyl Mitsubishi Diesel Engine of type... [More]

Fleet in service – exploit its potential, control costs: Area of adverse weather increases fuel costs

By Peter Pospiech at October 03, 2013 04:13
Filed Under: drive systems, Fuels & Lubes, General
Fuel consumption and time are an important factor when planning ship routes. But more and more also actual weather conditions are considered. Wind and waves have a significant impact on operating costs of fleets in service. Unfavourable conditions cause higher fuel consumption, delays and often also damages on ships or cargo. Even if the vessels captain cannot change the weather he has avoidance strategies on hand to bypass the area of adverse weather or can adapt the vessels speed to reach the expected danger area before or after the bad weather phase.  Storm and high waves increases time and fuel costs - but they can be purposefully bypassed The magic word is “Weather Routing”. Intelligent weather-routing can remarkably reduce these additional costs with less expense. Modern weather-routing software uses weather-, waves- and disturbances information as well as vessel hydrodynamic details for ships specific routing recommendations at minimal drive power and optimized... [More]

Fleet in service – exploit its potential, control costs: Fuel Saving with Trim Optimization

By Peter Pospiech at September 30, 2013 06:30
Filed Under: Company News, drive systems, Fuels & Lubes, General
The maritime-shipping industry has also been forced to contend with the key issues of energy efficiency and sustainability. Optimizing the trim of a ship is a good way to achieve lasting reductions in fuel consumption. In fact, trim optimization has been an object of investigation since the 1990s. Back then, forward-thinking German shipowners were using models in towing tests designed to determine the trim that produced the lowest resistance as a ship moved through water. These tests showed that in many cases a slightly lower forward draft yielded the ideal trim. Based on these findings, INTERSCHALT added a ballast optimization tool to its MACS3 loading computer system. However, over the next 15 years interest in this special module declined because the costs for conducting the associated towing tests proved to be too high. Significant fuel saving by trim optimization "Determining the optimum trim is one thing; being able to practically apply these findings in actual ship operation is... [More]

Damen offers ‘Quick Docking/Fuel Saving Package’

By Peter Pospiech at September 26, 2013 07:10
Filed Under: Company News, General, Shipyards
Damen Shiprepair & Conversion has developed a new innovative product, the ‘Quick Docking/Fuel Saving’ package. This offers owners a fast and low-cost additional docking with the sole aim of reducing fuel consumption in between the five-year statutory survey period. The first vessel booked under the new concept has docked at Damen Shiprepair Brest (France). It is the capesize bulker ‘Castillo De Catoira’ operated by Spanish company Empresa Naviera Elcano. Damen expects to bring more of its vessels to its ship repair yards. Jos Goris, Managing Director of Damen Shiprepair Brest and initiator of the concept, comments: “We know that hull resistance builds up during years of service and this can have a significant impact on performance and consequently, fuel costs. By introducing this product, we are thinking along with our customers and know that fuel costs are a major consideration for shipowners and charterers, especially in this economic climate.”... [More]

Fleet in service – exploit its potential, control costs: Increase of load draft

By Peter Pospiech at September 10, 2013 07:16
Filed Under: Company News, General
Vessels of the today’s fleet in service may be modified by increasing the load draft to improve the capacity. This results in a more efficient ships operation that is particularly worth at slow steaming and with heavy container loads. The plimsoll line If load draft and load capacity are increased at unchanged ships power the energy consumption per ton load is reduced – and causes therefore a better efficiency. For this only the plimsoll line must be changed. This relatively simple process can be done easily during the next survey and / or often during normal operation. At vessels with ice-class it’s important to consider that an increase of load draft normally comes to a downgrading or even a nullity of the mentioned ice-class for the new load draft. Before an implementation takes place the procedure of a feasibility study is highly recommendable to ensure that the load draft of the affected ship really can be increased. With this, the hull stability for the increas... [More]

Littoral Combat Ship Coronado (LCS 4) Completes Acceptance Trials

By Peter Pospiech at September 03, 2013 11:28
Filed Under: Company News, General, Navy News, Shipyards
Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship Coronado (LCS 4) successfully completed Acceptance Trials (AT) on August 23, 2013, in the Gulf of Mexico. This milestone achievement involved the execution of intense comprehensive tests by the Navy while underway, which demonstrated the successful operation of the ship’s major systems and equipment. This is the last significant milestone before delivery of the ship, which is expected in September.  The Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) is a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments yet capable of open-ocean operation. This vessel is the second of twelve, 127-meter Independence-variant LCS class ships Austal has been contracted to build for the U.S. Navy (including USS Independence (LCS 2), delivered to the Navy in 2009). The final 10 of the 12 were awarded to Austal as prime contractor subsequent to a $3.5 billion block buy in 2010.  Austal’s teaming partner, General Dynamics Advanc... [More]

Austal Celebrates Keel Laying for further Cape Class Patrol Boat

By Peter Pospiech at August 19, 2013 10:30
Filed Under: Company News, General
Australia has 36,000 kilometres of coastline and an offshore maritime area of nearly 13 million square kilometres. The new Customs and Border Protection Cape Class Patrol Boats will play a significant role in border security by maintaining a presence around Australia’s coastline and responding to reported or suspected border incidents and illegal activity. Customs and Border Protection vessels perform strategic patrols and tactical surveillance and enforcement for various agencies to address maritime security threats within and beyond Australia’s 200 nautical mile exclusive economic Zone (eeZ).  Demonstrating the rapid progress of the Cape Class Patrol Boat Program, Austal hosted on August 14 the keel-laying ceremony for the third vessel, Cape Nelson, one of eight 56-metre patrol boats that Austal is designing, building and supporting for the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service. Cape Class is a program of work that underpins Austal’s strategy as a g... [More]

Cavotec wins breakthrough MoorMaster™ automated mooring project in Norway

By Peter Pospiech at August 05, 2013 08:18
Filed Under: Company News, General, Ports
Global engineering group Cavotec, based in Lugano, Switzerland, has secured a significant order for its MoorMaster™ automated mooring technology at a new bulk handling application in Norway. The project has a substantial financial value — it is the largest single MoorMaster™ order in Europe to date — and indicates the potential for Cavotec's automated mooring systems at ports worldwide. Cavotec is to supply 18 MoorMaster™ 200B units for international minerals group LKAB's new iron ore berth in Narvik, northern Norway, on behalf of the PEAB construction and civil engineering group. The scope of the order includes manufacture of the mooring units, installation and comprehensive technical support. The units will moor bulk carrier ships of up to 185,000 DWT and 305m. This is the first MoorMaster™ bulk handling application in Europe, and the first located within the Arctic Circle. As such, the MM200B units for this project will be built to withstand the h... [More]

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