The Propulsion System of the Future

By Eric Haun at July 12, 2016 11:16
Filed Under: General, New Technology, Propulsion systems, Research & Development
What will the marine propulsion system of the future look like? An interview with Dr. Andreas Lingens, Executive Vice President Development at MTU. [More]

Wärtsilä, MAN Diesel & Turbo Renew Emissions Reduction Research

By Eric Haun at September 24, 2014 15:08
Filed Under: New Technology, Research & Development
Leading engine manufacturers partner to renew work toward increased efficiency [More]

Harnessing Wind Power for Auxiliary Propulsion

By Eric Haun at June 26, 2014 15:33
Filed Under: New Technology, Propulsion systems
Example of a bulk carrier with four Norsepower Rotor Sails on the port side   Finnish marine engineering company Norsepower Oy Ltd. announced this week that it will bring to the commercial maritime market an auxiliary wind propulsion solution aimed at maximizing cargo ship fuel efficiency, with first sea tests on a Finnish cargo ship slated to begin later this year.Norsepower’s Rotor Sail Solution is an updated version of the Flettner rotor, a concept that dates back to Finnish engineer Sigurd Savonius in the early 1900s. The Flettner rotor gets its name from German engineer Anton Flettner, who was the first to build a ship which used spinning vertical cylinder rotor sails for propulsion.Though the basis for this technology is not entirely new, Norsepower has improved upon the original concept with various improvements. Norsepower said its update uses improved technology, advanced materials and a leading-edge control system to allow the main engines to be throttled back when... [More]

Lower Fuel Consumption for Slow Steaming

By Eric Haun at May 30, 2014 12:50
Filed Under: General, Marine Diesel Engines, New Technology
New marine diesel engine from MHI-MME offers lower fuel consumption during slow steaming [More]

Wärtsilä’s New Inline Scrubber System

By Eric Haun at March 14, 2014 11:46
Filed Under: New Technology, Scrubbers
Wärtsilä said its new inline scrubber system offers a number of “notable benefits” over conventional exhaust gas cleaning systems. Already with several ships in line for installation, the company says its new product, saves space, lowers cost and eases installation.Important for all vessels, but particularly for smaller vessels and retrofit projects, space is of chief concern when considering engine room configuration. Add after-treatment products such as scrubber systems into the mix, and space becomes an even greater priority.Sigurd Jenssen, Director, Exhaust Gas Cleaning, Wärtsilä Ship Power, said, “Space availability is a challenge that makes it difficult for many vessels to have exhaust gas cleaning systems installed.” That’s why Wärtsilä has placed a great deal of emphasis on compactness when designing its new inline scrubber system, which was engineered to conserve considerable (and precious) space. The company said thi... [More]

World’s largest Bilobe-Liquid Gas Storage Tanks

Sinopacific builds cargo tanks for 9.686 cubic meter with BV-ClassThe future of the Natural Gas Shipping keeps a majority of the shipping industry busy. Again and again new equipment and machinery is developed. Such as in China. At present there arise the largest Bilobe-Liquid Gas Storage tanks.They are nearing completion at China’s Sinopacific yard and will be installed in a series of four 27,500 cu m semi-refrigerated LNG/Ethylene carriers building for Denmark’s Shipping Company Evergas. Each of the IMO Type C Bilobe tanks has a capacity of 9,686 cu m. Two of the tanks in each vessel will be supplemented by a third conical Type C cargo tank and a smaller LNG fuel tank on the deck of the vessels. International classification society Bureau Veritas is classing the world’s largest Bilobe-Gas Tanks. Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE ... [More]

MAN’s New EcoCam reduces fuel consumption

MAN EcoCam further optimises slow-steaming concept MAN Diesel & Turbo has introduced the MAN EcoCam as a retrofit solution for the low-load optimisation of its low-speed, mechanical engines with single turbochargers. The EcoCam offers significant fuel savings of 2 - 5 g/kW – with short payback times – and delivers an increased Pmax cylinder pressure through the adjustable exhaust-valve timing.Christian Ludwig – Head of Retrofit & Upgrade – MAN Diesel & Turbo, said: “Slow-steaming is now an established industry standard across all segments, including the tanker and bulker markets, and MAN continuously seeks to further refine its technology and improve efficiency. The MAN EcoCam adjusts the exhaust-valve timing between 10 and 60% load, giving a 2 - 5 g/kW fuel saving with minimal to no interruption to a vessel's schedule during installation. . For smaller engines, this can result in a payback period of as little as 1½ years as is the case,... [More]

Ghost ships on the Oceans – Who says it doesn’t work? Part 2

New functions for the autonomous ship The KISS principle will also be applied to the ship itself and it is also important to look at how existing vessels can be modified to support unmanned operation. At the hardware level, technical modifications will be necessary, for example to the fuel-processing system, while an electric-powered water-jet for back-up propulsion and steering may have to be retrofitted.New sensors to replace the look-out are also an important part of the unmanned ship. A combination of high resolution radar, low-Iight and infrared cameras form the 'advanced sensor system'. Most of the technology involved is already available and its adoption would be more a question of cost than of general availability. The sensor-system will be integrated with more conventional equipment such as the AIS system and ARPA radar. Computer-based data fusion, using Information from the various sensors, will further increase the capability of the sensor system. All these systems are alre... [More]

What’s Special About Third Generation Dynamic Positioning DP3?

By George Backwell at February 01, 2014 04:07
Filed Under: New Technology, Offshore
DP3 is a new offshore vessel positioning technology standard set by IMO that will enable a couple of new Farstad offshore vessels on the stocks in Norway to work safely in the most demanding and potentially dangerous situations using systems equipment provided by Rolls Royce.Basically, to maintain an accurate position determined mainly by satellite navigation system (anchoring is not in itself precise enough) an offshore vessel needs to be equipped with propulsors and thrusters controlled automatically by a dynamic positioning (DP) system in such a way as to oppose the resultant force of wind, waves, tides and currents. Dynamic positioning, propulsion & thruster schematic: Courtesy of Rolls-Royce Deep-water drilling for oil or gas (common now as shallower resources deplete) is an operation that often carries with it the need for jack-ups, construction and support vessels to operate in extremely demanding situations where any loss of position might result in fatal accidents, severe ... [More]

Ghost ships on the Ocean - Who says it doesn’t work?

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