Divers Save Navy US$1-million a Year on Waterjet Anode Work

By George Backwell at January 04, 2014 06:57
Filed Under: General, Propulsion systems
US Navy divers recently completed a first-time full underwater waterjet seal on the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) USS Fort Worth which enabled  them to inspect and replace the cathodic protection system anodes mounted in the intakes. On this waterjet propelled ship it’s a job that needs to be done every four months, and so NAVSEA’s Supervisor of Salvage and Diving (SUPSALV) was tasked to develop a procedure that would enable the anodes to be replaced at sea in order to avoid dry-docking. A3 Series Waterjet: Rendering courtesy of Rolls-RoyceIn early course Navy engineers developed a plate to seal the waterjet inlet, as well as external patches to isolate the waterjet, so as to create a dry working environment for the inspection (a fairly common procedure in smaller waterjet propelled vessels for this kind of inspection, but less so for a large warship of this type). Joe Theodorou, SUPSALV program manager pointed  out: “Having this capability saves the Navy $100... [More]

Natural Gas on the rise for Japan’s Workboats

NYK to Build Japan's First Natural Gas-Fueled TugNYK will build a tugboat featuring a dual fuel engine that can be powered by either Natural Gas, which will be stored as LNG, or heavy fuel oil. Other than LNG carriers, this tugboat will be the first building in Japan of a Natural Gas-fueled vessel. NYK has enhanced its initiatives to mitigate environmental loads through the practical realization of environment-responsive technologies such as solar-powered systems and air-lubrication systems. In 2011, NYK established a team in the company’s Fuel Group to research next-generation fuel alternatives to heavy oil, and looked into building a Natural Gas-fueled vessel with the cooperation of Nippon Kaiji Kyokai and others, based on the results of a survey conducted by the Japan Railway Construction, Transport and Technology Agency. Natural Gas received attention as a possible alternative to heavy oil because NG does not emit any SOX and produces far less CO2 and NOX compared to heavy ... [More]

Thruster monitor reduces downtimes and increases productivity

By Peter Pospiech at December 20, 2013 12:19
Filed Under: Azimuth pod, Company News, drive systems, Propulsion systems
Condition Monitoring Technologies (CMT) GmbH, Germany, has developed a flexible thruster monitor for the marine and offshore industry whose aim is to predict failures at the earliest possible stage, thus avoiding costly unplanned repairs, adjustments and downtimes, the German company said. In the modern shipping and offshore industry, unplanned thruster repairs and adjustments - both in dry dock and in situ - always lead to enormous costs, loss of productivity and decreased competitiveness. CMT has developed a unique flexible thruster monitor that ensures that any damage, wear or necessary adjustments are identified immediately, allowing preventative action to be taken. The CMT thruster monitor system is unique in that it provides real-time feedback on a whole range of both oil and vibration parameters, providing unparalleled comprehensive control and security. The fully automated system is said to be ideal for both new- buildings and retrofits as it can be easily combined with any exi... [More]

New Helicopter-Competitive Offshore Crew Boat

By George Backwell at November 09, 2013 05:00
Filed Under: Offshore, Propulsion systems
A hi-speed offshore crew transfer catamaran is under construction in the Incat Tasmania shipyard whose speed and passenger comfort, designers Incat Crowther say, will make it more cost-effective for transfers of crew and cargo supply operations to offshore platforms than a helicopter. A bold claim and worth looking at. Helicopter replacement Hi-speed crew transfer cat: Image courtesy Incat Crowther The new 70-m (230-ft) vessel due for launch in 2014 will be capable of carrying 150 passengers and 14 crew, along with 200 metric tons of deck cargo, and is the largest so far to be fitted with HamiltonJet propulsion. Power comes from four 2880 kW MTU 16V 4000 series M73L engines rated at 2050 rpm, driving two 900mm diameter waterjet pumps to give an expected top speed of 36 knots with an efficient service speed of 30 knots at full load and 90% MCR.  In conjunction with the propulsion water jets, four azimuthing drop-down thrusters forward will help take care of the maneuvering demands ... [More]

Wärtsilä’s next generation of thruster

By Peter Pospiech at October 22, 2013 12:01
Filed Under: Azimuth pod, drive systems, Propulsion systems
Wärtsilä introduces a new series of both steerable and transverse thrusters that will further develop the current portfolio. The new Wärtsilä Steerable Thruster series (WST) is being introduced to replace the company’s Modular Thruster and Compact Thruster series, while the new Wärtsilä Transverse Thruster series (WTT) is replacing the current range of transverse thrusters. The new products have been developed in response to changing market demands, requiring competitive thruster products which are more efficient and cover a wider power range. The latest insights in thruster design were implemented using state-of-the-art numerical simulation tools. The first product to enter the pilot phase is a 4500 kW under water (de)-mountable steerable thruster, the WST-45-U, which began its pilot phase in summer 2013. Two more products, the WST-14 and the WTT-11, are scheduled to begin their pilot phase before the end of this year. Wärtsilä will contin... [More]

Fleet in service – exploit its potential, control costs: Bunker saving with fast vessels

By Peter Pospiech at October 10, 2013 04:05
Filed Under: Company News, drive systems, General, New Technology, Propulsion systems
Propulsion improvement adaptations achieve fuel consumption decrease, depending on ships type, of up to six percent. To reduce fuel consumption on vessels, different propulsion improvement adaptions can be done – according to type of vessels and operating range. While pre-swirl-equipments increase the propeller force, boost nozzles the drive efficiency by an effective propeller force. Post-swirl-equipments are leading partly the torsional energy back into forward speed. Because of these pre-swirl-equipments or nozzles fuel consumption can be reduced by up to 5% and by propeller fins and rudder bowls of up to 2%. The following adaptations can be used: pre-swirl-stator, post-swirl-fins, nozzles, propeller fins, German Leitrad and Costa-Bowl. Which adaptation leads to an efficiency increase depends on the operating profile of the vessel. To evaluate the potential as well as the interaction with the ship’s hull and also other components, an analysis by the help of computational... [More]

European Inland Waterway Shipping in search of the ultimate propulsion

By Peter Pospiech at October 08, 2013 05:36
Filed Under: drive systems, General, Marine Electronics, Propulsion systems
MV GOBLIN navigates variable Willy Vranken, owner of Scheepvaartbedrijf VrankenBV based in Maasbracht, Netherlands, has put a lot of thoughts into a propulsion system for his new inland waterway ship, which ensures the maximum benefit for him. At Boost-Shipyard, Trier / Germany, the hull was built: “I want to have a ship which is of high quality. The imported hulls do not fulfill my requirements”. The complete interior has been done by Dutch company Koedood Dieselservice. The bulker, named GOBLIN, features 135 m in length, 11.45 m in width and a max draft of 3.79 m. With this the ship can load 4.400 to. Bulker GOBLIN ready for unloading 4.000 to corn at Cargill-Krefeld The hybrid propulsion Willy Vranken has decided to go for a two propeller ship. “With this, I have the possibility to navigate also in low water periods, because both the propellers have a smaller diameter”. The drive line consist, for each shaft, of a 12 cyl Mitsubishi Diesel Engine of type... [More]

Norwegian Ferry Propulsion Retrofit a Money Saver

By George Backwell at October 05, 2013 03:47
Filed Under: Propulsion systems
Rolls-Royce has won a contract to supply its Promas Lite propulsion system to the Norwegian ship owner Hurtigruten for their cruise ship MV Richard With. Propeller efficiency improvement for the ship is estimated to be between 11-14 per cent at 15 knots. MV Richard With: Photo courtesy the owners Promas Lite is a version of the Rolls-Royce Promas integrated propeller and rudder system which is designed specifically for vessels already in service. It is well known that with advances in propeller design, propeller blade changes, or the fitting of new propellers, can have a significant effect on propulsive efficiency, fuel consumption and, therefore, emissions. With Promas Lite these improvements can be maximised, as the propeller and rudder are treated as a complete system, and further increases in efficiency can be achieved with improved manoeuvrability for only a small increase in cost. First, extensive modelling work is carried out at the Rolls-Royce Hydrodynamic Research Centre in Sw... [More]

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